Poster Presentations

P1. THE EVOLVING INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY- THE TEENAGE YEARS

Amy Gay

When Binghamton University’s open repository, the ORB, was first created, it was viewed primarily as a platform for publications created by university faculty, staff, and students. Over the last couple years, however, it has expanded to be more than just published works–including data sets and image collections such as photo exhibits from research projects and our art museum, sculptures created by faculty, images from social movements participated in by members of Binghamton University, and student posters from their on-campus research presentations at events. In addition, the ORB is used to manage and publish several scholarly journals. This poster will show how this IR has evolved what can be defined as digital scholarship and what we see to be shared in the future as it continues to grow.

P2. BYSTANDERS NO MORE: LIBRARIANS AS PLAYERS IN THE GAME

Lusiella Fazzino, Natalia Sucre, Julie Turley

OERs directly address the textbook affordability crisis. Academic librarians are playing a prominent role in implementing the OER solution. A group of Instruction Librarians teamed with their Scholarly Communications Librarian to remix an information literacy textbook. They successfully advocated for its use in a credit-bearing information literacy course for their college’s liberal arts adult education B.A. program. This interactively designed three-dimensional poster showcases the financial and pedagogical benefits of OERs. We will describe from start to finish our process of remixing this OER. Participants will learn how to develop OERs to serve the needs of their libraries, students, and faculty.

P3. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH CONSULTATIONS AS A SUPPLEMENT TO TRADITIONAL LIBRARY INSTRUCTION APPROACHES

Don LaPlant, Brendan Aucoin

Collaborating with faculty open to exploring new instructional approaches, SUNY Cobleskill’s library offers consultation appointments to students enrolled in select research-intensive courses. This poster presents assessment data suggesting these appointments were more effective than traditional one-shot sessions and online tutorials at meeting key learning objectives. In addition to sharing compelling data from our pilot study, we provide a model for expanded studies and a marketing tool to be used with instructional faculty unconvinced of the benefits of library instruction.

P4. BEYOND THE BOOK: MOBILE APPLICATIONS IN ACADEMIC LIBRARY COLLECTIONS

Jamie Saragossi, Kathleen Kasten, Laura Costello

This poster will demonstrate the use of mobile applications by researchers, students, and teaching faculty in academic settings and the ways in which academic librarians can provide service and outreach to ensure mobile applications are seamless, discoverable resources within the library’s collections. The importance of a collection development policy, outreach initiatives, including instruction and consultations, as well as the need for ongoing evaluation will be addressed using developing practices in the field as well as first hand experience with collecting apps.

P5. MOTIVATING FACULTY TO CREATE OER: WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN’T

Danielle Masursky

Many of the SUNY schools are expanding the adoption of OER materials because of their desire to support student achievement and provide the most cost effective resources for students. One challenge they are facing is engaging their faculty in producing OER on the subjects in which they have expertise. This poster presents several techniques which have proven to be successful in encouraging faculty participation.

P6. IN PURSUIT OF RELEVANCE: INCORPORATING DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN A GRAPHIC LITERATURE COLLECTION

Andrea Kingston

The new Graphic Lit Collection at Monroe Community College’s LeRoy V. Good Library centralizes our graphic novels, comics, and manga in a high-traffic area rather than having them distributed throughout the stacks. In addition to increasing student and faculty engagement with our book collection, a primary goal of the collection is to emphasize a diverse array of perspectives and authors from both the US and around the world while making connections to various aspects of the college’s mission, values, and curriculum. This poster will provide an overview of the collection and its potential relevance to various curricular topics and campus initiatives.

P7. THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGIN’: ENVISIONING NEW PRACTICES & POLICIES IN ALMA

Nancy Abashian, Bill Jones, Carrie Marten

This visually appealing poster presentation will help attendees learn about the Access Services & Resource Sharing Working Group (ASRS), including its members, its charge, and how it fits within the larger context of the LSP Migration Taskforce. Attendees will be introduced to the projects we’ve been working on, policies that we have developed, and the future directions of the working group. This poster session will also provide an opportunity for attendees to ask questions, seek clarification, and share ideas.

P8. CREATING INCENTIVES FOR OER ADOPTION

Aaron Dobbs, Maggie Albro

This poster will give a summary of discussions, proposal development, and approval for incentivizing OER adoption in courses at Shippensburg University. We will describe how the mini-grants program, funded out of the Provost’s office, aims to increase student success by removing barriers to textbook access via OER.

P9. BASELINE DATA FROM THE SUNY PLATTSBURGH COMMUNITY ON OERS AND TEXTBOOK COSTS

Malina Thiede, Joshua Beatty, Debra Kimok

This poster will summarize data collected from two surveys that were conducted in 2017 and 2018. One primarily measured faculty knowledge of and attitudes toward Open Educational Resources (OERs), and the other primarily measured the cost of textbooks for students and their behavior and educational outcomes that result from the cost of textbooks. The data provides a snapshot of the state of textbook costs and OER adoption as we embark on an initiative to expand OER usage on our campus.

 

P10. FUN AND GAMES WITH COPYRIGHT

Paul Bond

If we’re going to embrace “open,” we need to develop an understanding of copyright and Creative Commons amongst ourselves and in our faculty. A group of librarians in the US and UK have created a Copyright Card Game to turn copyright discussion into a fun and interactive experience. This poster will explain how the game has been used in faculty development workshops, and give access to the cards and presentation materials so you can use it in your own workshops.

P11. OPENING UP ABOUT STUDENT PRIVACY: SURVEYING STUDENT OPINIONS ABOUT LIBRARIES

Jessica Ramey-Rhodes, Esta Tovstiadi, Jenica Rogers, Lauren Jackson-Beck

SUNY Potsdam Libraries are surveying our students to learn about their level of understanding and their acceptance of use of student data at their college library. This poster describes our survey questions, methodology and plans for data analysis and future directions.

P12. ASSESSING LIBRARY DISPLAYS

Katherine Brent

Many libraries create book displays – seasonal, promotional, or otherwise. Are your book displays doing what you want them to? Have you articulated what your goals are for your displays? Is all your evidence of success anecdotal, or have you done any formalized assessment? This year, the Van Wagenen Library conducted a more formalized assessment of its scheduled displays, based on a set of goals and objectives written as part of an assessment workshop at the beginning of the academic year. Come see what we learned!

P13. USING SMALL GRANTS TO MAKE THE LIBRARY A DRIVER OF COLLEGE & CAREER ACCESS & AFFORDABILITY

Jennifer Parker, Rebecca Hewitt

Every semester hundreds of students come to the library searching for their course textbooks because they cannot afford to purchase or rent these required materials. At SUNY Polytechnic we pursued local grant funding to allow us to purchase 23 texts for student use in 2017-18. Altogether, these items circulated 148 times between August, 2017, and the second week of February, 2018. Our initial efforts proved so popular that the Utica Student Association allocated funds to our efforts, and we expanded our purchases to include examination prep guides such as NCLEX to aid in career transition.

P14. WHOSE JOB IS IT? STRATEGIES OF A TEAM-BASED INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY

Alicia Marrese

St. John Fisher College’s Lavery Library has a growing institutional repository, but no full-time position dedicated to it. In the five years since the repository’s creation, Lavery Library has employed a library-wide team effort to support the repository’s development. This poster depicts some of the successful strategies this small academic library has employed while collectively endeavoring to archive new content, including vital collaborations between library departments and other faculty and staff on campus.

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